January 21, 2015

My top tips for glove etiquette and wearing vintage gloves


Early last fall while Tony and I were savouring our marvelous holiday on Vancouver Island, my lovely friend - and perpetually stylish fellow vintage blogger - Brittany from Va Voom Vintage posted the following question on my personal Facebook page:


"I was just admiring some of your beautiful vacation photos and I thought I would love to see a post on tips for wearing vintage gloves! I have a lovely collection but I never wear them. I'm never sure what sleeve length looks best with glove lengths, glove etiquette, how to care for them and keep them clean, etc. I'd love some tips on how to wear them casually also. I always feel too dressy with gloves but your outfits look so relaxed and effortlessly stylish!"


I'm immensely touched that Brittany asked for some of my thoughts on this topic and that she sees me as a lovely example of someone who knows how to sport gloves successfully. Today, with the hustle and bustle of the holiday season behind at us once more, I finally have the time needed to properly devote myself to delving into this fantastic topic and addressing Brittany's points in helpful detail.

Over the years I've both worn vintage gloves in many (many!) of my outfit posts and also blogged about them in different entries such as How to Size Vintage Gloves (which, according to my blog stats, has turned out to be one of my most popular posts ever) and How I Store My Vintage Glove Collection, both of which I highly recommend you check out, if you haven't done so before (or want a quick refresher on either subject).

Having already written whole posts on those two subjects, I won't really dive into them here today again. Instead I'm going to cover the specific points that Brittany raised, because they are both excellent questions and topics that I haven't really gone into depth about here before (and it's high time that I did).

Gloves are, to my mind, one of the most elegant, stylish and becoming accessories ever invented. So crucial to most women's (and until the early twentieth century, many men's as well) wardrobes were gloves up until the 1960s, that I'd go far even to call them a garment unto themselves, not just an accessory.





Nearly all women and girls alike owned one or more pairs of gloves before the radical shift in ladies wear that we saw take place during the swinging sixties and funky seventies that would follow. Though gloves did make a bit of a resurgence in the 1980s (and not just fingerless styles alla Madonna and Cyndi Lauper), an era that was very keen on reviving many elements of 1940s and 50s fashion for a spell, this once staple ingredient of a woman's wardrobe has never truly come back into full-fledged use again.

As society (in general) continues to prance down an ever more casual sartorial path in most instances, though dress gloves (aka, non-winter gloves) may have a small surge in popularity again every now and then (especially on the design cat walks), I'd be willing to bet you a steak dinner that they'll never become a key player in most ladies closets ever again. And, you know, I think that humanity loses something on the personal fashion front because of that.

Historically, gloves served both a practical and visually appealing purpose alike. In the Purell-on-every-street corner twenty-first century it can become easy to forget that the world was not always as clean and highly sanitized as it often is today. Prior to the turn of the last century in particular, the world was often dirty and smoggy in a way that few of us today experience. Clean water usually had to come from wells or rivers, not from the tap, and at the same time, we also lived and worked and went about our daily lives in buildings and homes that were frequently far more chilly than the central heated universe we know today.

Gloves kept hands clean and warm and showed that a woman knew the social decorum of dressing for a given occasion. Though cleanliness and warmth became less of a reason to sport gloves as the Edwardian era gave way to the 1920s and beyond, the latter point still rung true and most ladies did not consider their ensembles - baring those for very casual, beach or sporty settings - complete without a pair of gloves all year. This mindset remained in place until the early 1960s, at which point in fashion history where gloves began to be seen less and less frequently (much like ladies hats).





Mothers would have passed along their knowledge on wearing and buying gloves to their daughters, and for those young ladies who may not have had such guidance in their life, fashion magazine, home ec books on personal style, and society as a whole whole be there to help guide them on this front.

Though buying gloves may not have been meet with quite the same élan or thrill of shopping for a new hat, dress, suit or coat, they were still something that most women enjoyed purchasing and owned multiples of, so as to have the right pair for just about any occasion or ensemble that life threw their way.

Traditionally (and still to this day, objectively, but we're going to focus on vintage gloves in particular in today's post) gloves were available in a few relatively standard lengths. These included the following:

-Wrist length gloves (also known as "shorties"): The shortest style of glove, these hit at or slightly above the wrist bone and are very versatile.







-Gauntlet gloves: Characterized by a turn-up or cuff (be it subtle or dramatic) that often points outward (much like the sleeve styles on some 1950s dresses), gauntlet gloves often came part way up the forearm, though they could be wrist length as well. They were a popular style and remain a dramatic, beautiful way to add a stylish dose of mid-century pizzazz to any ensemble.







-Classic, bracelet or coat length gloves: Different names for the glove length that commonly measures in the range of 13 to 14 inches long and hit at the mid-way point, or a little above it, on the forearm. A very flattering and versatile length, this style was commonly seen in ruched gloves, which offered the wearer the ability to length or shorten her gloves by stretching or bunching the fabric (to a degree) to suit her sleeve length.






-Elbow length gloves: As their name suggests, this length of glove hits at, just below, or slightly above the wearer's elbow (as in the case of the sheer black pair on the right in the ad pictured below). They are usually the most dramatic length of glove seen during daytime wear in the mid-twentieth century and were often sported come evening time, especially in settings where opera length gloves may have been a touch too formal or impractical.






-Evening or opera gloves: Generally a more formal style of glove that hits above the elbow (and in extreme cases can reach all the way up to the underarms). During the Victorian era and early twentieth century, in particular, they often featured rows of small buttons (as did many gloves of all lengths in general), which could be fastened by hand or via the use of a specialized tool called a glove hook.






-Mousquetaire gloves: An old-fashioned style of formal evening gloves dating back to at least the sixteenth century that have a small number (often three) buttons at the wrist so that a lady can slide her hand out of them when needed, such as for eating, but have the rest of the glove remain in place (she then slides her hand back in, without needing to take her gloves on and off entirely to do so, once she’s done eating, smoking, etc).







-Other, less common styles of gloves include entirely fingerless styles that loop around one finger (often the middle finger or between the thumb and first finger, as in the marvelous crochet pair pictured below) with a small band of fabric and those with the fingertips removed but base of the fingers still intact. Generally speaking, unless your personal style veers towards the dramatic, goth, steampunk or Victorian side of things, you won't frequently wear such styles of gloves and may not need to own them at all (though they are fun to have all the same, especially for dramatic ensembles and costume parties).








For centuries gloves have come in a wide range of materials, with even more bursting onto the scene in the twentieth century thanks to the invention of various synthetic fabrics. One can commonly find vintage gloves in the following materials: leather (very much including buttery soft kid and doe leather), suede, faux suedes and leathers, silk, nylon, acetate, rayon, jersey, cotton (including crochet cotton), wool, and lace.

Silk gloves were still very much in use until the 1930s and continued to be seen on a less frequent basis after that point, but the need to ration silk during the war years meant that gloves were frequently made from available natural and synthetic fibers instead and many vintage gloves from the 1940s and 1950s that you'll come across today are suede, leather, nylon, rayon, satin, acetate, and cotton, in particular (of course, in theory, a pair of gloves could be made from virtually any material that could be sewn, knit or crochet, by those listed above are amongst the most common).







You may come to realize, especially after you've been wearing vintage gloves for a while that you have a preference for certain types of fabrics. I personally gravitate towards faux and real suede, nylon, jersey knit, sheer, and cotton gloves, as all of these styles frequently have a little bit of stretch to them, which is something that I find very becoming in how a pair of vintage gloves looks on my small hands with their relatively short fingers.

The season and weather (remember that rain and snow can be nightmares for genuine suede and leather, especially if it has not been weather treated, as well as for silk), the occasion and the rest of your outfit will help dictate both the type of fabric that your gloves should be made of and also their length and colour (when in doubt, black, white or cream gloves that hit at the wrist or mid-forearm in nearly any fabric, save for satin for day wear, is a safe choice).

In terms of partnering certain gloves with certain outfits, I would suggest keeping the following points in mind (they harken back to decades past and will help you create a cohesive look between your gloves the sleeves of your dress, blouse, jacket or coat):

-As a general rule, the shorter the sleeve,the longer the length of the glove can be. For example, an elegant sleeveless summer dress could be worn gloves up to the elbow, if desired. Opera gloves (especially those with buttons) are not usually worn during the daytime, save for if you're attending an extremely formal event, and even then, doing so has never been an overly common practise in the slightest.




{Isn't this an ingenious glove design? I would absolutely love to add a pair of Hands-Away gloves to my personally collection one day!}


-That said, when you're wearing sleeveless or short sleeve garments (by which I mean those that hit at or above the elbow), you can certainly wear gloves of any length you like. Look at your garment as a whole. Is it casual, semi-casual, formal, office appropriate? A pair of dark brown ruched elbow length gloves might overpower a delicate peach summer sundress. Where as a pair of ivory or mint green wrist or coat length gloves could be the very picture of taste and loveliness.

Conversely, if you're wearing a heavy navy blue tweed suit in January while window shopping outdoors, a pair of frilly cream lace or crochet gloves might seem oddly out of place and certainly not do much to keep your fingers warm. You'd be much better suited by slipping on a pair of wrist, coat or elbow length suede, leather, or thicker cotton gloves instead.







-There has always been a bit of debate amongst the stylish set (very much including magazine editors of the past) as to if it's in good taste to wear bracelets over top of gloves. I personally feel that if the gloves are a suitable length for your sleeves and your bracelets don't try to compete with them for attention on your wrists entirely, this look can be chic, charming and very pretty.

You may find though that if you're especially petite, the combination of both can risk overwhelming the visual lines of your arms. In which case, it may be best to stick to just one or the other or to wear a single, understated bracelet atop one glove (say a tennis bracelet or small carved bangle). It is, generally speaking, okay to wear bracelets above the top of the your gloves, especially if doing so fills a small gap between the hem of a sleeve and the top of the glove itself.

The same goes for rings. Typically, unless your wedding and/or engagement rings stand to rip or otherwise damage a glove, it's best to leave it/them on but forgo wearing other rings over or under your gloves (the lumps, bumps and lines they create and really throw off the sophisticated appearance of a gloved hand).






-Keep fabric in mind. As touched on in the second point in this list, fabrics need to work in tandem to ensure that gloves and your clothes look their best together. Generally speaking similar fabrics and fabric weights go well, but a subtle degree of contrast (say nylon gloves with a silk dress or crochet gloves with a cotton blouse) can be absolutely beautiful together. So long as one does not massively overshadow the other, you're on the right path.





-Sheer gloves are beautiful, especially if they have frills, ruffles, pleats or ruching on them, and certainly have a well deserved place in any glove wardrobe, but keep in mind that they tend to suit the warmer half of the year better, both due to the weather and because their daintiness often compliments spring and summer fashions and fabrics better than the sturdier styles of fall and winter, when fabrics like velvet, wool, tweed, denim, and corduroy are out in full force.






-Remember as well to keep your other garments, accessories, shoes and handbags in mind when selecting your gloves. You want them to compliment or tastefully standout from these items, but not to look comically out of place. A sense of harmony amongst all the elements of your outfit is one of the best ways to instantly be the most stylish women in any room and is, to my mind, a point that is often sorely lacking in contemporary fashion (where patterns, fabrics, lengths, textures and jewelry are mixed and matched with near reckless abandonment of the art of fine dressing).






-If you're wearing a jacket, blazer or coat, you will typically want the hem of your sleeve to to overlap with your gloves at least a little (or by the same token for your gloves to overlap with your sleeves. At times there can be something a touch jarring about a flash of bare skin between a jacket sleeve and a glove, save for with the most casual of styles (say a cotton bolero jacket and pair of crochet summer weight shorties).

When in doubt, opt for longer rather than shorter glove lengths. Your sleeves will cover them and if you remove your jacket and have a short sleeve garment below, they'll provide a bit of warmth and glamour at the same time.






-What about gloves worn with pants or shorts? As pants and shorts were newcomers to most women's wardrobes from the point of the 1930s onward, and then (until the 1960s) commonly worn only in very casual, rugged or sporty settings, or when a woman was entertaining in a hostess pants suit indoors, the rules of glove decorum weren't as tied to pants or shorts as they were to skirts and dresses.

I think that a tailored 1940s ladies pants suit can look lovely with shorties, as can a pair of wide leg 1930s or 40s trousers worn with an elegant blouse (and optionally a blazer and/or vest/waistcoat), but if the combo of gloves and pants doesn't float your boat, don't worry for a moment. The two, save for winter gloves worn for warmth, not for the sake of fashion, have not spent a lot of time together in the world of ladies wear over the decades.

It is also rather rare to find historical examples of women wearing shorts with gloves, simply because shorts have long been such a casual garment and thus gloves were not called for. I have seen at least a couple of modern vintage loving/wearing ladies combine the two, but it can be tricky and runs the risk of making people think that your sense of fashion is rather off kilter. If you do opt to pair the two, make sure they look incredible together and ideally stick with wrist or mid-forearm length gloves at the very most.



{Pants and shorts were intended to be very casual when they were first adopted by women, thus the rules and etiquette of wearing gloves that governed skirts, dresses and suits did not usually apply and the two were not commonly partnered at all. This pair of stylish young 1940s women, both of whom sport trousers here, for example did not wear gloves and they would seem out-of-place in the context of these easy going daywear styles.}


Due to the unfortunate fact that so few women wear (or even own!) gloves these days, sporting them in public is apt to draw attention and (hopefully positive) comments. Much as with vintage hats, it's easy to feel self-conscious about donning vintage gloves at first.

To help counterbalance these feelings, I suggest beginning with wrist or coat length gloves in light (white, cream, beige, pale grey, nude, the softest pastels, etc) and dark neutral hued gloves (such as black, brown and navy blue) first. Stick to classic fabrics like suede, kid leather, and cotton and opt for at least one other accessory or piece of jewelry in the same colour (or nearly so) to keep give your outfit a sense of cohesiveness and make your gloves appear to jump out at onlookers a little less.

Chances are, the longer you wear vintage gloves, the more you'll begin to feel at home in them and want to start building up your glove wardrobe and getting more adventurous with the styles, lengths and colours you sport.

For those just starting out on the vintage glove wearing front, or who already own but don't usually sport the pairs they possess, I would recommend that you ensure you're got the right glove size, then proceed with building up a basic glove wardrobe that includes at least one dark and one light coloured pair of wrist, coat and/or gauntlet, and elbow (or nearly so) length gloves. These six or so pairs, especially if they're in various fabrics, sheens, weights, etc will provide you with a surprising number of stylish options.




There are very few outfits that can't work with either white or cream or conversely black, brown, dark grey or navy blue gloves (just as the same rings true for shoes and handbags in the same hues).

As with clothing, some glove fabrics hold up better than others. Intact vintage silk gloves are fairly hard to find these days for that very reason. Sheer and extra delicate fabrics are prone to runs and rips. Pale leathers and suedes stain easily, and synthetics often absorb dirt and stains and aren't quick to release them upon laundering, so it never hurts to try and think about where you'll be sporting your gloves and what you'll be doing them while they're on before you pick a pair at home.

When it comes time to launder my gloves (which I do often with those fabrics that can be safely washed - a camp that suede and leather do not usually fall into, however as this 1940s Women's Home Companion article shows, in some cases, it is possible to successfully do so), I always (fittingly, one might say :)) hand wash them in cold, luke warm, or warm (but never scalding hot) water with a very mild soap such as Woolite or Tide Free and Clear. In a pinch I have even shaved a few flaks off of a bar of Dove soap and successfully used that to get my gloves spic and span again.






Assuming your gloves are not made of an especially delicate fabric, gentle hand laundering followed by air (indoors or out) drying will help keep stains at bay and may prolong the life of your favourite pairs. Gloves can usually be mended to a degree. If a split or small hole occurs on a seam, the glove can usually be turned inside out and fixed with small stitches and thread in a matching hue.

A hole on the fingertips, palms or elsewhere can sometimes be darned, but they're apt to show and can detract from the beauty of your gloves, so if they do occur, it may mean that that pair has reached the end of its days (though in some cases, you could add embellishments, appliqués, trim or other notions to both the damaged glove and its mate to hid the hole, stain, etc).

Though most folks today will not be aware of traditional glove etiquette and thus oblivious to if you're violating it, as vintage loving ladies, it never hurts to observe the following classic glove etiquette rules:

-Feel free to gloves when outdoors, shopping, driving, walking, and holding hands.

-It is entirely acceptable to leave your gloves on when indoors for most activities including at church, at a wedding (including during a receiving line), and while dancing.

-Remove your gloves while being seated for dinner, eating, smoking, applying make-up, playing cards or board games, or doing anything where there's a high risk that you'll stain/damage your gloves (in other words, don't peal carrots with white kid gloves on!).

-It is generally okay to leave your gloves on while drinking or if you're only eating a small, non-messy hors d'oeuvre.

-It is entirely acceptable to shake hands with your gloves on, with exceptions made for it you're meeting with the president, prime minister, or top ranking religious officials.

-Try to keep your gloves on during appropriate times. If you need to remove them, slip them into your purse or a coat pocket to cut down on the risk of accidentally losing one or both gloves. You can also purchase a handy little device called a glove clip that will help keep your gloves in place wherever you may happen to take them off (track down a vintage version, they're easy to find, especially online, as they tend to be more attractive than their plastic modern counterpoints).

-For detailed information of opera glove etiquette, be sure to check out this post that I found on the website Gloria Glover Gloves that has oodles of great tips on that very subject.


When it comes to storing your vintage gloves, my post on the subject (and some wonderful further suggestions in the comments on it) should really help steer you in the right direction. You may at times find deadstock/NOS (new old stock) gloves that are still in their original plastic bags. While it's a-okay to keep those bags in general (I have a few tucked away myself), it's recommended that you do not store your gloves themselves in them, if at all avoidable. Such bags are not archaically safe usually and may do more harm then good to your lovely vintage gloves in the long run.

As a general rule of thumb, I like to air out my gloves after I wear them and before I put them away. I find that draping them over a towel bar, a nightstand (I like to put a towel or cloth down first just in case there were any splinters or nicks in the wood that could damage the gloves), a (turned off!) lamb shade, a clothes drying rack, or vintage glove drying forms (thin pieces of sturdy plastic shaped like gloves that can be found on sites like eBay and Etsy, as well as some vintage and antique stores, in particular) are all good options on this front.

Airing out your gloves after you wear them will usually prolong the time you can go between washes and help them feel fresh and dry (if they've gotten damp or sweaty, I mean) the next time you slip them on.

In no small part because they were once such a major wardrobe staple for most women, there are (thankfully!) still lots of vintage gloves on the market today, many of which are both in good condition and reasonably priced. I stock vintage gloves in my Etsy shop all the time and have found them to be one of my best sellers since I opened my doors there last May. In particular, I find that beautifully coloured gloves and leather pairs in good, stain-free (or nearly so) condition, as well as ruched and sheer styles are amongst my top vintage glove sellers.

Putting it all together, you'll quickly come to discover that wearing gloves is usually an absolute joy. You'll develop preferences for certain styles, fabrics, colours and even patterns (there are lots of fun and elegant patterned vintage gloves out there such as polka dots, flowers, and stripes) and begin to see how glove length and sleeve length work work best when they're not at total odds with one another other.








Of course, as much as the points in this post are helpful and are ones that I abide by myself usually, it's important to let your own personality and fashion sense shine through in your glove choices. Wearing gloves should never be a point of stress, worry or difficulty.

Experiment, take photos and assess how you think a given pair of gloves worked with a certain outfit. Ask a trusted friend or relative for their impute, chat with other vintage wearers and remember that if no one else in your town still wears glove, you have every right and reason to, if your heart so desires.

Gloves are, just as they have been for centuries now, a practical, stylish, elegant and very enjoyable item of clothing. They suit our beloved vintage looks to a tee and are truly at home in any yesteryear fashion loving lady's wardrobe.





{To learn more about a specific image in this post, please click on it to be taken to its online source.}



I hope that today's post has helped answer your wonderful questions, dear Brittany. If you, or anyone else, have follow up queries, by all means please keep them coming in the comments (or by email, if you'd prefer). As someone with a vintage glove collection numbering over 100 pairs, I'm no stranger to wearing these marvelous accessories and always love to chat more on the subject.

Have fun, treat yourself to a new pair of gloves, and please don't hesitate to share your favourite glove tips here anytime.


88 comments:

  1. Me again. :)
    (grabbed a moment of time, so I post away).
    Wearing gloves, in this little town of mine, looks strange - when done by a woman. It seems to be perfectly normal for men to wear leather gloves. It is also normal for women to wear winter mittens, or woolen gloves. But, there's a frown upon wearing anything else.. almost makes one think men in this town are allowed to be more "posh" than the ladies.
    Another thing folks frown upon is: wearing gloves when gardening. Many, many women get down and dirty, and claim there's no need to put on gloves. Sure, no real need, since ground would not kill you, but.. dear, I'm working in the office, and I can not allow all the people who come here see my hands looking polished, clean and gentile..
    And, so, I not only wear leather gloves on the street.. I wear gloves in the garden, when waching (dishes, bathroom...) AND when doing any yard work. Does that make me a bit narcissistic?!

    Marija

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    1. That's a really fascinating observation, my dear. Though it's commonplace for men and women to wear gloves in the colder months here (as in all parts of the world), aside from that I almost never see men or women wearing gloves throughout the rest of the year in public (the closest thing would be female grads going to their prom at the end of the school year and then it's almost always elbow length satin gloves). Perhaps the only exception I can think of it, is the very rare occasion when one will see an elderly woman en route to church who still has a hat (usually a 60s pillbox) and gloves one, but even there, I can't recall the last time I spotted such.

      Now, when it comes to gardening, gloves are normal for most folks here and one can buy gardening gloves just about anywhere (I've even seen them at some supermarkets). It's interesting that such a mindset exists where eschewing them is held up in some kind of positive regard. Why would one ever want to be unnecessarily harsh on their hands? Doing so doesn't make you vein/narcissistic in the slightest. It's logical to want to keep your hands healthy, happy, clean and as youthful as you can - certainly many vintage ads for everything from laundry soap to household cleaners knew this and wrote copy to that extent. I always wear gloves when a task that can avail of them calls for it and like to think it's part of the reason my hands still look youthful at the ripe old age of 30. :)

      Thank you very much for your great comment, dear Marija, I always love chatting with you!

      ♥ Jessica

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  2. This is such an amazingly comprehensive and informative post, Jessica! I've really enjoyed reading it on my lunch-break... gloves are something I know very little about, it turns out! I don't own any vintage pairs and they probably don't quite fit with my own style, but I love learning about them (and, of course, seeing you wear yours!). The social history of fashion is so interesting and you clearly know a lot! I love knowing all the names for different lengths now :) CC x

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    1. You are immensely welcome, dear CiCi. I'm really happy to know that you found this post informative and helpful. I had an a fantastic time putting it together and am so happy that Brittany asked about this subject last fall - it was just the catalyst I needed to finally put more of my thoughts about gloves down in one handy-dandy spot. :)

      I think that gloves can be worn with anything and everything you desire - there are no absolute rules with fashion, just what your heart is calling you to wear. Even if your usual outfits might not be ones that folks wear with gloves doesn't mean that you can't (leather and suede gloves in particular are great, I find, on that front). I bet you'd enjoy wearing them and might even turn into a fellow vintage glove addict! :)

      Big hugs & joyful Wednesday wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  3. What a comprehensive article Jessica, you've obviously put a lot of thought and time into researching the subject - thank you for doing the leg work for us!! I own a small collection of gloves, most of them winter-appropriate ones, and some vintage 'shorties' as well as some long gloves. Any ladies reading this article that fancy taking off their gloves in a saucy way should read Dita Von Teese's book as she gives tips for removing gloves with one's teeth!

    Hope you're having a super week xx

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    1. Marvelous tip and reading suggestion, dear gal, thank you very much for sharing it. You know, I have't actually read that book yet myself. It's been on my Amazon wishlist for ages though. Perhaps the next time someone very sweetly gives me an Amazon gift certificate for my birthday or Christmas (always a massively adored and appreciated present), I will pick it up at long last.

      Thanks again & have a beautiful day!
      ♥ Jessica

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  4. such interesting topic!
    i have a weak spot for colorful leather gloves - but i have to buy them new because vintage ones are always to small for my huge hands. and buying new pretty leather gloves can be very expensive. and when you think how fast a glove can get lost..... dilemma.
    i washed velour leather gloves very successful - the same way like you did with your textile ones. after drying them gently (not in the sun or near a heater) i spray them with impregnation spray. this helps to keep the gloves clean for a longer time.
    hugs from germany to canada!!!!!!
    <3

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    1. Wonderful advice for helping to clean and preserve gloves, dear Beate. Thank you very much for sharing it here with us. I know that I can always turn to you for great tips when it comes to anything pertaining to textiles.

      Tons of hugs coming right back at you from Canada,
      ♥ Jessica

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  5. Wow! I hadn't given gloves a thought till now, but this made me want to run out and buy some! :D
    Thanks very much for this. I'll be giving gloves a try!

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    1. I'm thrilled to lit a spark there for you, dear Mary. I find that vintage gloves are a great deal like potato chips (or any other super tasty snack food), it's darn near impossible to stop at just one! :) In other words, once you've found a pair you like and that fits you, you'll want to keep adding more and more of them to your wardrobe.

      Happy glove shopping!
      ♥ Jessica

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  6. I adore gloves and have only started to seriously seek them out when thrifting this past year. Before that I owned one black pair and one white. I've gained about 8 pairs to my collection and would like to try and sew my own in some prints(plaid comes to mind) but finding the right fabric and getting the right fit seems like an impossibility on something so intricate. I guess I'll never know if I don't try though. :)

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    1. What an exciting thing to even think about creating. I've seen numerous vintage glove patterns over the years, but not being a sewer myself, haven't created any from them (or any pattern). I've heard that having a glove form can help a great deal (understandably), but I'd venture to guess that it's not essential. If you give creating your own gloves a spin, I wish you the utmost of success and would love to see/hear about the results.

      Have a beautiful Wednesday, dear Debra!
      ♥ Jessica

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  7. Thank you so much for this wonderful post Jessica! I have certainly learned a lot from it, and will keep all this in mind with my outfits in the future. Thanks!

    Brigid
    the Middle Sister and Singer

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    1. It is my very heartfelt pleasure, dear Brigid, you're welcome. I'm tickled pink to know that you enjoyed and learned from this post. That - for all my lovely readers - is precisely what I was aiming for. :)

      Big hugs to you and your sisters,
      ♥ Jessica

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  8. Jessica, this is such a wonderful post! Indeed, I think it was you that inspired me to start wearing vintage gloves a few years ago, and I now own more pairs than I should freely admit to :) I am fascinated by the glove wearing etiquette, it's a useful guide to refer to if in doubt. Thank you for this truly insightful post!
    Jenny xxx

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    1. You're very welcome, sweet gal. If I did play a roll in helping spur on your own passion for wearing gloves, I'm truly honoured.

      Gosh, do I hear you there! My own glove collection is in the range of 100 pairs these days and yet I doubt I'll ever stop growing it. There's always shades, styles, lengths, patterns, fabrics, etc that I don't have and which would be a good fit for my wardrobe. Plus, gloves are often still a relatively affordable accessory in the vintage world, which means you can treat to yourself to a pair every now and then and not have it break the bank (yay!).

      Thank you for your lovely comment - big hugs!
      ♥ Jessica

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  9. I do find that wearing gloves can be even more "strange looks from people" inducing than even hats sometimes. I don't own many gloves myself, I have a black crochet wrist length pair, a burgundy velvet pair, and two pairs of "silk" (aka poly satin) evening gloves in black and in light gold. I bought the evening gloves last year to go with my Edwardian evening dress and to wear with 1920's dresses. I know gloves complete a vintage look, but they have never really entered my radar or ended up on my shopping list. Part of the problem is that I do have larger-ish hands I suppose, because vintage gloves at shops never seem to fit me! I wish there was a way to go back in time for a day and go to a glove counter at a ritzy department store and have gloves custom made, now that is luxury!

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    1. True - it's almost like some people today think that if you're wearing gloves there must be a reason you're intentionally covering your hands (say like a skin condition, scars, etc). It's amazing how far away we've gotten from this once standard garment in just a few decades and that gloves seem so out of place to many in the 21st world. Aside from being stylish and adding warmth, they're beautiful and practical, too boot. I find my manicures last long and my hands stay cleaner when I wear them out and about than when I don't.

      The gloves that you own all sound really lovely. I have a wrist length pair of burgundy gloves which are some of the most frequently worn in my closet (in 2012 in particular, I was sporting them nearly weekly).

      Though small and medium sized vintage gloves are easier to come by for sure, there are certainly larger ones out there. I've seen and sold some before and would be happy to let you know the next time I acquire some (please feel free to share your glove size, hand measurements and desired styles/colours of gloves with me anytime).

      That would be so awesome, I agree! I swoon at the mere thought of visiting a vintage glove counter (or vintage department store point blank). Ohhh, for a time machine! :)

      Tons of hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  10. Sempre tive dificuldade em usar luvas mas acho muito chique, adorei o post.
    Beijos

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  11. I've never really considered gloves before as it's generally before my preferred time period so I never realised how much there was to consider nor how many options were available! What a truly fascinating read, and I must say I really appreciate how much time and effort has undoubtedly gone into putting this post together. I love how perfectly illustrated it is with the accompanying images of stylish ladies.

    I particularly enjoyed the etiquette portion, and wondered if you'd written/can recommend a read on hat etiquette? As I know you wear many yourself, and it's a style I admire but often feel at a loss with: how do I style my hair, keeping the outfit balanced as a hat can feel like such a statement piece, and silly little things like do I take it off when I'm inside (particularly when it's a wider brim, I can sometimes feel conscious of taking up too much space even though I'm probably not). Many of the tips featured here definitely cross over which is what made me think of it.

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    1. Hello my sweet friend, thank you very much for your terrific comment and question about vintage hat wearing/ettique. It's true, being a lover of 1960s fashions, you're preferred era is the one that saw the general demise of glove wearing. They were still fairly commonplace in more formal settings until at least the mid-decade, but from about 1965/66 onward it was rare to see them in magazines, ads, or on the street (save for religion settings such as church). I really like the look of long 1960s evening dresses partnered with a bouffant hairstyle and elbow/opera length gloves. Very chic and glamorous and something that gives 60s fashion fans today a chance to sport gloves with period authentic looks, if so desired.

      Ask and ye shall receive! :)

      http://www.chronicallyvintage.com/2012/10/chatting-about-vintage-hats-with.html

      If there's anything that you'd like to know that I haven't covered there and/or if you need me to go more in-depth, please let me know and I'll do my best to answer any and all questions. :)

      Tons of hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

      *PS*

      It is proper form for a lady to leave her hat on indoors (in almost all settings), if so desired, unless doing so risks substantially blocking the view for others, such as at a theater performance or the cinema.

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    2. Thank you! I was sure you must've written something on hats before, I shall enjoy reading that! It's funny how things like hats and gloves have gone from being absolute fashion necessities to being things that completely confound most people nowadays. And thank you for clearing up the indoor issue for me!

      Yes I do too love that early '60s look of an evening dress with elbow gloves a la Jackie Kennedy, so glamorous! It's a style I often overlook I must admit, I really should try and introduce it into my wardrobe as I do admire it.

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    3. You're super welcome, dear gal! Delighted to be of help. So true! I can't fathom willingly giving up hats, gloves and many other mid-century (and earlier) fashion mainstays. Some saw a revival in the highly feminine/romantic styles of the 1980s, but none have truly come back to stay again and a good part of me doubts they ever will.

      I bet that classic Jackie O/Grace Kelly in the 60s look would be stunning on you! I actually have a number of such 1960s evening dresses in stock in my Etsy shop right now and had a blast trying on those that fit me while listing them (to check for conditional etc and just for fun :)).

      Big hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  12. Wow. This is such an awesome, informative post. I've been thinking about gloves for a while now - I love seeing how other women, yourself included, incorporate them into outfits, and they just seem like such a whimsical touch of authentic vintage flair that I would love to try them out myself. Although I know it might be a challenge to find ones that are sized correctly for me, this makes me feel like I should make the effort to hunt some down. As you said, it seems sort of like wearing a hat. I used to feel incredibly conspicuous in a hat, even a bit silly, but now that I'm used to wearing them regularly, I love them. It's fun to practice the etiquette; sure, no one else might notice, but it's something that can really make you feel like a lady.
    <3<3
    Zella Maybe

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    1. Exactly, and I think that has always been one of the most important reasons to have ettiquette rules in just about any sphere. How you feel, carry and conduct yourself when you're following them is usually quite (or entirely) positive and can even make one happier, so it's worth at least giving them a spin sometimes.

      I have a strong feeling that you'll absolutely adore vintage gloves, much like you now do hats, my sweet friend. If you'd ever like to share your glove size and hand measurements with me, I'd be more than happy to try and find some vintage gloves that would work for you. Small and medium sized gloves are easier to come by, but there are large and even XS versions out there too and I've certainly come across all of them over the years. It would be a pleasure to try and be of assistance to you on this front.

      Thank you very much for your great comment - have a beautiful Wednesday,
      ♥ Jessica

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  13. Happy New Year Jessica! Thank you so much for the info on gloves. I would like to wear them, but don't know much about them. I also have the issue of having large hands and most sizes available in vintage gloves are usually too small . They aren't gargantuan or anything lol, but rather large for women's gloves and they must have stretch to fit. I didn't realize that there are so many different kinds to choose from and will be keeping my eye out for some that fit. Thanks again!

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    1. Thank you very much, dear lady - joyful wishes for 2015 to you as well! It's hard to believe that we're already three full weeks (to the day!) into this inaugural month already. Where does the time go?

      Though, objectively, it is easier to find gloves for small and medium sized hands, I've certainly seen and even sold some for larger hands. If you ever want to share your glove size and measurements with me, I'd be more than happy to keep my eyes peeled for larger gloves and let you know when I find some next that are of the type you're hunting for.

      Thank you very much for your lovely comment - have a fabulous Wednesday!
      ♥ Jessica

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  14. I was born in the early 30s. White wrist gloves were always put away by Labor Day except for some rare dances in winter. In the winter you opted for bone/beige shorties if you needed to wear something in 'like' white. The gloves that hit mid forearm we always called matinee length but there were lots of different names for that length glove and often the name given was regional. Far as learning glove etiquette, it was part of every young gal's lessons in cotillion (or other like named 'grace' classes) that most everyone I knew attended between the ages of 7 and 11). I already knew my glove 'things' from my mom by the time I went to cotillion classes, but it was fun to practice the rules we learned about wearing gloves or not for various things you might do when wearing gloves like paying for something, taking your hand out of the little wrist button area and tucking the loose fingers into the upper part of the glove arm etc. My glove wardrobe HAD to have the basic colors, white, navy, beige, bone, black -- gray and brown were desired and you filled in with other assorted colors as your outfit/occasion called for them. I was given a small glove pouch to keep in my purse where I slipped my gloves when they needed to be off so they never got next to possible dirty clutter in my purse. I have not see a glove pouch since the 50s being sold and doubt there are many of them around anymore or if they are, it's not known what they are and thought to be a cosmetic case of some sort. Gloves were part of the outfit and you always had fresh ones ready to go which meant back ups to back ups especially in white and bone that would need to be washed between wears. I also had 'good gloves' and daily wear gloves --

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    1. Hello dear lady, thank you very much for your truly lovely comment and for sharing some of your firsthand knowledge and experience with wearing gloves. I'm honoured that you did so here with us today. I have seen larger glove "envelopes" and boxes for home storage, but agree that the small pouches that went into a ladies purse are like dinosaurs these days. I've not yet found one in person myself, but certainly someone could make their own if desires. I'd venture to say that even a non-sewer could hand sew one, if so desired (and you know, you've really got me thinking that I should make one for myself and maybe some to give as gifts to fellow glove loving friends). Thank you very much for reminding me about the once common accessory.

      I truly loved your comment - thank you again so much for leaving it. I hope that you beautiful a beautiful day!

      ♥ Jessica

      *PS* You and my maternal grandma, who was born in 1930, are are very close in age, so I can't help but feel a strong connection to you because of that (and because you adore vintage!).

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  15. This is so great! I had a few pairs of vintage gloves from my grandmother, but recently found a whole bag of them at a vintage sale. A few were cheap reproductions, but there were some gems found in the bunch! I love gloves (especially during the colder months here) and relish any chance to get to wear them. Most of mine are wrist length, but I do have a few pairs of elbow length gloves now. I definitely learned a thing or two from this article and there were a couple of types I had never heard of or seen before. Now I want to do some more scouring for gloves when I shop!

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    1. What an awesome score!!! I'm always (always!) on the hunt for vintage gloves when I'm out and about, be they for myself or the shop (especially the shop these days). Congrats on finding some excellent ones amongst the lot. It's always interesting when gloves come to you in multiple pairs like that to think about if they were all from the same person's wardrobe original or simply lumped together by someone else at some point. If they were all from the same person, I like to try and imagine what her style and the rest of her closet might have been like.

      Enjoy your fab new gloves and have a beautiful week, sweet gal!
      ♥ Jessica

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  16. I learned a lot from this article. I love the look of gloves but have not been brave enough to wear them except in the winter when I wear leather gloves that reach about 2-3 inches above the wrist. I will also wear them with cardigans when it's chilly in the fall and spring which I think looks very sharp, especially with 3/4 length sleeves.

    On a utilitarian note, I always wear rubber gloves for dish-washing and heavy cleaning, and gardening gloves for yard work.

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    1. Hi lovely Dawn, I'm delighted to know that this post was beneficial to you. I had a blast writing it and sharing more on a topic (vintage gloves) that has always been near and dear to my fashion loving heart. I love the look of mid-wrist/forearm gloves with 3/4 sleeves so much, too. It's classic and very, very elegant.

      I rock gloves for cleaning, dishes, etc, too. I have sensitive skin and want to protect it both for that reason and so as to try and halt undo aging/wear and tear on my hands, so work gloves are a must in my books.

      Should you ever have any glove related questions that I haven't covered here, please don't hesitate to give me a shout. :)

      Big hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  17. This is wonderful! I recently got rid of a lot of gloves because I simply couldn't figure out how to wear them properly. I'm going to keep my eye out for some that will better suit my wardrobe, now that I feel a bit more confident about it!

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    1. I'm truly happy to help bolstered your confidence on the glove wearing front, my dear friend. That's an excellent point - some glove styles and lengths do tend to suit each of us better. My favourite length on myself personally is those that hit mid-forearm or just below the elbow (though I certainly have many pairs in other lengths, too, and enjoy wearing a range of sizes).

      If you ever have any glove related questions that I haven't covered here, please don't hesitate to let me know. Much like vintage hats, vintage gloves are a topic that I could happily chat about until the cows came home! :)

      Big hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  18. My general rule of thumb for delicate garments is to wash them in Soak. (This goes for cashmere sweaters, silk blouses, and bras.) With cool water, add 1Tbsp soak per 1 gallon of water. Put the garments in, feel free to swish around a few times, and after soaking for 15 mins, remove and dry. Because I'm generally washing sweaters or bras, I have extra window screens that I keep handy to dry things flat on, and I usually roll the garment in a towel to remove excess moisture.

    Items come out smelling clean (I use scent-free formula), and it's non-damaging of delicates. I DO find that after excessive water-removal, my towels can get a little stained. But some of that is probably dye leakage. So, at the risk of sounding like a corporate shill, I recommend that people try Soak for things like gloves.

    -- Tegan

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    1. Thank you your detailed washing tips, dear Tegan, I really appreciate them, as I'm sure many readers will. I haven't tried Soak's offerings yet myself, but I've been hearing good things more and more about them in the past few months. I'm always looking for great products to wash both my own wardrobe and the items I list in my Etsy shop in, so if I happen to see Soak's offerings for sale here in Canada, I'll definitely give them a try.

      Many thanks again!
      ♥ Jessica

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  19. What a wonderful post, Jessica. I must confess that other than looking at how you and some of my favourite Golden Age stars wear/wore their gloves (thank Heaven YOU are still around, though few of the actresses remain!) to learn how gloves ought to be worn. As always, though, I've learned something from this post (and will now join you on the hunt for Hands-Aways, ooooo!). The rest, such as etiquette, I sort of hoped to be using common sense with! You are right about the 'clean hands' factor; it is funny, but until I began wearing gloves I never really realized how dirty the world around us is. ;)

    Also, more than one pair of gloves in my collection has been lovingly mended, especially a pair with a sort of Art Deco-esque design embroidered onto them. As an embroidery aficionado, it has been sort of fun for me to fix wear spots and tears by disguising the mend with a little tone-on-tone 'vine' of leaves. Necessity is, after all, the mother of invention! Of course, a few pair are simply beyond any resurrection, but do come in handy for decorating our Christmas tree (the bottom branches of which are sprayed with Bitter Apple because of our cats) and other tasks where I wish to protect my hands but don't need protection from water (that's what vinyl gloves are for...!).

    One thing I have read elsewhere is that when choosing gloves, you do not want them to clash too much with your 'costume', as the writers of the day called outfits. ;) The reason given was so that one's hands did not distract from one's face and expression; I thought that both charming and fair advice.

    Have you a favourite pair or five? Also, have you ever considered dyeing or actually dyed a pair of gloves to a needed colour? This is something I've considered of late—with red shoes especially (as I've a couple of red handbags to match), sometimes I fear the buff colour doesn't really work, and goodness knows there are plenty of white gloves both in my collection & the world.

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    1. Hello dear Jen,

      Thank you very much for your thoroughly terrific comment. I always appreciate the thought, time and attention to detail that you put into the comments that you bless my blog with.

      Aren't those Hands-Aways amazing? If, many more years down the road, I still haven't found a pair, I might seriously commission a seamstress to make me a strikingly similar pair.

      It's wonderful that you enjoy mending those that come your way in need of (or develop said need for) some TCL. I suspect that many (!) a pair of vintage gloves has met an untimely end over the years because their owners weren't able or willing to do the same. I've done small mends to a couple of pairs in my own collection and love that just a few quick stitches brought them right back to life. I love your clever idea of using too-far-gone-to-save pairs (or singles) on the Christmas tree. That's really cool!

      That's a good tip for sure and one that I would say I try to abide by usually myself. I like a harmonious colour palette no what I'm wearing, so clashing and I rarely cross paths (IMO).

      Wow, it's really hard to nail down a favourite (or five). Some that currently spring to mind are a 1940s pair embellished with brass studs/nail heads, a super glam 1940s pair with big cuffs adorned with gold mesh fabric on those cuffs, a charming 40s/50s white pair with a red tic-tac-toe pattern on them, my ruched 40s/50s mustard yellow pair, and any and all involving stitchery.

      I haven't ever dabbled in dying my own gloves, too. I have a pretty extensive rainbow's worth at this point, but if the need arose, I would be willing to do so to a very plain white pair (in general though, I won't alter vintage unless doing so is the only way to save a piece, it almost seems sacrilegious to me - silly though that might sound to some folks).

      Huge thanks again for your fabulous comment! I hope that 2015 is off to a splendid start for you, sweet lady!

      ♥ Jessica

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    2. Jessica, your hesitance to alter anything vintage is very well understood; there is a many-darted, many-pleated shirtdress in my wardrobe I'm preparing to have altered by a professional, as the amount of work necessary is such I'm afraid my own attempt would harm it. (It's too long...in the waist, alas! Much more effort to fix up than most too-long frocks...It needs to be taken in as well, and with three French darts on each side...) I've also become pretty good at non-destructive alterations.

      The tic-tac-toe gloves sound just darling! They're probably such fun to wear. My favourites tend to be the embroidered ones—and an otherwise plain black nylon pair with flared, ruffled cuffs.

      Thank you again for this post, it was quite fun to read and of course the illustrations are marvellous. ;) Perhaps if several of us gang up on one seamstress for the Hands-Away gloves, we can resurrect the style!

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  20. Great post! I always admire your outfit posts complete with vintage hat and gloves. While I admire vintage gloves, my big hands, the hot climate and Australia's very casual dress code, make wearing them (and finding them) a little challenging. I think this might come in handy for some pin-up events in the future

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    1. Thank you very much, dear gal! Penticton, located in one of the hottest regions of Canada, gets mighty warm in the summer, so I hear you there. But even when the mercury skyrockets, there are ways to still comfortably sport gloves, such as option for sheer, mesh or crochet versions, short/wrist length styles, and cooler colours like white, cream, and pale pink. I put these tips to work myself each summer here.

      Big hugs & many thanks for your lovely comment,
      ♥ Jessica

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  21. Wonderful post! I was anxiously awaiting this one but had to be in court all day yesterday and couldn't enjoy it until now. You really hit the ball out of the park. You cover all aspects of the subject with depth and lucid explanation. Since gloves are worn so seldom today, they immediately register as vintage in style. Thank for the serious effort you put into this. Great education for us.

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    1. Hi Ally, you're immensely welcome. I've been eager to get your take on this post ever since we chatted about it on Twitter the other day. I'm delighted to know that you enjoyed it and found it educational. That is precisely the combination I was aiming for in penning it. :)

      Thank you again & have a fantastic evening,
      ♥ Jessica

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  22. What a great entry! I have a handful of vintage gloves but am always nervous to wear them. It can make me feel costume-y rather than chic, and I tend to have the same trouble with my hats! Your outfit posts are always a great source of inspiration, and hopefully some day soon I'll be more comfortable going all-out with my accessories!

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    1. I fully understand those feelings, my dear. When a garment is not part of the mainstream culture any more and we're apt to get plenty of looks and/or comments when we sport it, it's totally natural to feel a sense of hesitate to concern about doing so. Interestingly, I've never felt that way about vintage clothing myself - in fact, hand on my heart, at this point in my life I feel significantly more self-conscious on those rare occasions when I wear modern styles, but I can completely understand where you're coming from.

      I would suggest starting with some basic styles and colours, such as black, white, navy blue and cream, and partnering them with outfits that are very classic, but not per se full on vintage. See how you feel while wearing them in such a context and if that costume-y element starts to vanish, move up to pairing them with full on vintage looks (where they're apt to look most at home). Take mall steps and before you know it, you might just just wonder how your wardrobe every survived before you had a hefty collection of vintage gloves. :)

      Big hugs and tons of support if you try wearing them more often,
      ♥ Jessica

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  23. Gloves are so classy, I love all the old ads!

    Mal
    http://acookinthepast.blogspot.com/

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  24. What a fabulous post, dear. :) It answers all questions I've had about gloves. Thank you so much. You really are a pro. :) I only have a few pair of gloves, which I love but don't know when to wear. I will definately not wear them to work (except for winter gloves for keeping warm), and when I am home alone it does not give any meaning to wear them. So it is very rarely I use them, but boy, do I love them. I feel so feminine and perfectly vintage when I do. I have been much in doubt about etiquette, should I remove them when shaking hands, when eating, dancing, etc. Now I have all the answers to my questions at hand. I will reread them and learn them by heart to be sure I do it correct. Dear Jess, you are my vintage-wikipedia. :) And then I came to think of something I've also been in doubt about, namely capes. Perhaps you could one day write a post about cape etiquette? I have several in mink, cashmere and silk and feathers, and I am sure etiquette differs from materials. I would love to use mine much more often, but I don't know if they are only for formal wear, if it is allowed to keep it on while eating (it is often chilly at the beginning of the dinner), or is it worn as a coat, which you take off when you arrive? Just an idea for my vintage-wiki-ekspert. lots of e-hugs from chilly Denmark (still no snow)

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    1. That is truly marvelous to know, my dear friend! Should any other questions ever arise, please don't hesitate to fire them my way. I love your suggest about doing a post focusing on capes/stoles/wraps and garments like that. It's definitely one I'll add to my "to write" list. I love capes myself, but if we're talking the big, long (sometimes hooded like a cloak) version, I don't own many. I think this is an area some of the repro brands would be wise to cover.

      I can't begin to tell you how touched I am to be called your Vintage Wikipedia. That is really and truly a compliment of the highest magnitude. Thank you so much!

      Huge hugs and smiles (I'm beaming right now!),
      ♥ Jessica

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    2. Oh, you are so very welcome, dear. :) I don't have the long and/or hooded ones either, just short small ones, vintage and made of mink. And I really love them. I have quite a collection of shawls, cashmere, pashmina, cotton, you name it. And in all colours. I is a nice and practical accessory, so some good advice would be appreciated. Wishing you a lovely weekend. :)

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    3. A wrap and cap dedicated post you shall have then, my dear friend. It may take me a while, but I'll set the ol' thinking cap on and aim to write one in 2015 for you and everyone here to enjoy and hopefully learn from. I wouldn't say it's necessarily an area of fashion that is as a rule/etiquette centered as gloves, but there are still some tips there and we can look at history, styling ideas and other related points. It will be tons of fun, I'm sure. Thank you again for the great suggestion!

      Have a beautiful weekend!
      Jessica

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    4. Oh, lovely, I will look forward to it then. You can wait til the beginning of Autumn, when the wraps and shawls in question will get a come back. Then all your fans and vintage loving gals can get inspired and know the rules for wearing them. :)

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    5. Great vintage loving minds! I swear, I was thinking about posting it around the start of fall and even made a note of that in my future posts idea list. :) We're two peas in a pod, dear Sanne! :)

      ♥ Jessica

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  25. I am very happy and excited about posts as well as explaining to me that this serves as a guide for beginner in vintage style. I am even beginner, I feel like a baby crawling in style, have a lot to learn and a long way with hard work to achieve my goal.
    These gloves are beautiful! A while ago I got a glove handmade crochet, very beautiful!
    I've been searching in some online stores in Brazil, are beautiful gloves in leather!
    Dear Jessica thank you for sharing your knowledge with us.
    A hug from beginner friend Cris vintage!

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    1. Hello dear Cris, following on the heels of our recent emails, I had a strong feeling that you'd enjoy this thorough guide to wearing vintage gloves. I'm really happy to know that such was/is the case. Vintage gloves are one of the best accessories out there in my books. They're still often quite affordable, come in countless colours and styles, and really add a fabulous finishing touch to any old school look.

      Your handmade crocheted gloves sound beautiful as to the leather ones your country specializes in. If I can ever be of help to you in your glove hunt, please don't hesitate to let me know.

      Tons of hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  26. Your post is beautiful and practical -- my favorite combination!

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  27. how lovely, and what a great question Brittany had. a new friend i made through my blog a i did a little vintage gift exchange of our own and she sent me the most darling little pair of gloves. (Hannah Batchelder) i've been wondering the exact same things. thank you, Jessica, will defiantly keep this on hand.

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    1. You're very welcome, sweet gal. Agreed! I love that Brittany asked me about this topic. It's one that I can happily chat about from sun up to sun down.

      How wonderfully lovely! I swapped Christmas presents with a few of my online friends each year and always find that doing so is one of the most enjoyable highlights of my holiday season. It was really nice of Hannah to send you some vintage gloves. What a thoughtful, stylish and practical present.

      Big hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  28. Damn I really loved this post, it was just what I needed! I can't find any vintage gloves that fit me (were they tiny or what? I don't think my hands are that big!) so it's hard to find gloves that have that vintage vibe :\ Anyway, great job on this post, so complete!

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    1. Why thank you, my dear! I'm delighted to know that you enjoyed this post so much (that puts a big smile on my face!). Though small and medium sized vintage gloves are easier to come by, there are plenty out there in large and even XS sizes, too. If you'd ever like to share your vintage glove size and hand measurements with me, I'd be happy to let you know if I have any stock that might fit you and/or to keep an eye out for some that might.

      Many thanks again & have a beautiful day!
      ♥ Jessica

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  29. Jessica, what a fantastic post...so much information here! I also enjoyed the images. Thank you so much for sharing.

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    1. It is my sincere pleasure, Linda. I'm delighted to know that you enjoyed this glove fact filled post and its accompanying images. I had a true blast putting it together.

      Wishing you a beautiful weekend, lovely lady!
      ♥ Jessica

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  30. Great stuff! I haven't been game to wear gloves in non-winter months either, but I did get given a few pairs last year, so I should try it! One good thing here is that the winters are mild enough that we have a lot of days where it is cold enough to wear gloves without drawing attention to yourself, but mild enough to not have to wear a heavy pair.

    My sister is a glove fan and collector (though she has a way to go before hitting 100 pairs!), and has crocheted pairs, embroidered on existing gloves (copying another vintage pair), and attempted sewing a pair as well (I think that is still an ongoing project). One day I'll get her to do a guest post about it on my blog! The embroidery was a particularly lovely way to make a plain vintage (or newer vintage) pair that bit more special.

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    1. Immensely so! I haven't ventured into embellishing or embroidering any of my gloves yet, but the more I think about it, the more this appeals to me. Ideally I'd like to find a modern source for budget-friendly white/plain coloured colours for this purpose so as to preserve vintage ones as they are. But if we're talking truly plain white vintage gloves, I might be able to bring myself to alter them...maybe! :)

      That would be really cool! I'd love to see your sister's work and get her know-how on this topic. It's really special that you both enjoy elements of vintage fashion.

      Tons of hugs & happy weekend wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  31. Wow! What an outstanding and well informed and very well written post. There was so much information on there that I never knew about glove wearing and I'm thrilled to now be informed! Thanks so much Jessica for posting such a great post, I will be sharing this with friends..for sure!

    Liz :)

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    1. Dear Liz, you flatter and honour me with your immensely kind words, thank you so much. I'm thrilled to know that you enjoyed this fun look at vintage gloves so much. if there's everything about vintage gloves that you'd like to know, but which I didn't cover here, please don't hesitate to ask - it might just spur on another post on this topic! :)

      Big hugs & tons of happy weekend wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  32. I own a beautiful pair of black lace gloves. Sadly, I've never really worn them, because they disturb me somehow. Maybe I should try them again...

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    1. Hi sweet dear, oh no, I'm very sorry to hear that. I have uber sensitive skin and have encountered a few pairs of gloves over the years that bugged me, too. Some were synthetic blends and one was lace as well. I'd suggest trying a soft cotton or (if you wear animal materials) suede or kid leather in a natural shade (sometimes, I suspect, it's the dyes more than the material itself causing the problem).

      Have a fabulous weekend,
      ♥ Jessica

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  33. I'm looking for the perfect vintage gloves who fits on my style, and your post was a amazing. Is full of information and great tips. As always, here is on of my fav places ever! =)

    Wish you an amazing 2015 full of happiness!

    XoXo, Pri
    VINTAGEPRI | Facebook | Bloglovin | Pinterest

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    1. I'm delighted to know that you enjoyed this vintage glove guide, dear gal. I sell vintage gloves in my Etsy shop and usually have at least a few more pairs waiting to be listed that aren't up in the shop yet, so if I can ever be of help to you with your hunt for the perfect pair, please don't hesitate to let me know.

      Tons of hugs & happy weekend wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  34. This is such a brilliant post, so well written and really interesting. I didn't know half these things about gloves and I feel really well informed now. Your love of the subject really shone through. I loved all the pictures that you chose to illustrate your post with, so glamorous! I think I must have man hands as I have yet to find a pair of vintage gloves to fit me. I do own a lovely crochet pair but they are way to small. I have a few knitting and crochet patterns for day gloves, perhaps I shall share some on my blog after being inspired by this post of yours.

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    1. Thank you so much, my darling friend. It's very true that there are more vintage gloves out there in the small and medium sized range and they often were cut for very slender fingers. That said, I have come across some XS and some large and XL gloves before, too. If you'd ever like to share your vintage glove size and hand measurements with me, I'd be delighted to keep my eyes peeled for some mid-century offerings that might work for you.

      I'd love to see those crochet patterns and am sure many of your other readers would, too. Great idea for a post!

      Tons of hugs & happy wishes for this lovely new week!
      ♥ Jessica

      *PS* Thank you very much for your latest email last night.

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  35. I adore this post! I would love to wear vintage gloves, but I have nothing to wear them with. I inherited some lovely vintage gloves from my grandmother, but find it impossible to find a dress that will fit me (asymmetrical hips and short trunk).

    I also found it interesting all the hubbub caused when Amal Clooney wore gloves to the Golden Globes this year. The fashion community was out in force! It seems like most didn't like it (especially since she apparently made them himself), but I thought she was elegant.

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    1. I couldn't help but crack a smile when I caught wind of that as well. To think that something as timeless and elegant as gloves would ruffle anyone's feathers. Other than the fact that I would have personally have worn a different colour of glove with that dress, I loved that she sported them and wish that we'd see as much on the red carpet more these days.

      How lovely that you inherited some vintage gloves from your grandma. If you wear skirts or suits, gloves can look smashing with them as well (aka, they don't have to be paired only with dresses to look amazing). I even like the idea of gloves with a beaded 50s cardigan and classic black pants - very Audrey-ish. :)

      Big hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  36. What a terrific bookmark worthy post on the topic of gloves! They really do add a great accent to a vintage outfit and it is so fun to match them with a particular accessory, like a hat. I like to keep my eye open for designer gloves and ones with lots. It is difficult with my large finger size to fit into a lot of vintage gloves, there are so many out there that I have to pass on. I love a good gauntlet glove, these are my favorites. I recently came across a pair of white gloves with red embroidery details and this got me thinking that this is such a fun way to jazz up a pair of plain white gloves, to add accents of stitch color. A wonderful post dear Jessica!!!

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    1. Thank you very much, sweet Joanna. I had a feeling that you, a fellow die hard vintage glove fan (and wearer) would enjoy this post - very much including the images in it.

      I used to buy glove lots online, too, but after getting super burned once (more than half the pairs were literately in shredded tatters, which the seller did not discuss in the listing) and less so a second time, I stopped purchasing them that way. I'd do so again though, if I could really get a good sense of the quality of the gloves through the photos provided of them,

      Gauntlet gloves are fabulous! They are like the chicest of chic exclamation points one can put on a mid-century outfit.

      Your red and white gloves sound fabulous! Though I am always leery of altering perfectly good vintage, I think I could make an exception for white gloves. That said, I really wish I could find a modern source of inexpensive white cotton or nylon gloves to jazz up 'til my heart's content. If I ever do find such, I will let you know right away.

      Huge hugs & many thanks for both of your great comments today,
      ♥ Jessica

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  37. I have tried again and again to wear gloves and do so on occasion, but it really isn't a vintage accessory I get into as much as I do bangles, brooches, or even hats. :(

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    1. Don't worry in the slightest. We all have garments and accessories we're more pulled towards than others. If gloves aren't, as the British might say, your bag, that's totally fine.

      ♥ Jessica

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  38. I knew very little about gloves until i came across this post.
    I have never worn a pair "fashionably"or to match an outfit - just for keeping my hands arm in cold weather.
    Here gloves are only worn at parades by those playing instruments or the majorettes.
    My grandfather's sister is probably the only woman I knew that wore gloves and she only did this to drive.
    She was quite a fun lady.
    Oh and you have me wondering how you store your over 100 gloves !!

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    1. Hi lovely Lorena, I don't think that you're alone there at all. We have two or three (or even four now in some cases) of generations of women who have not worn fashion gloves on a regular basis (if ever) and the fact that you know of even one relative who did puts you ahead, so to speak, of many folks. It's lovely that your great-aunt wore gloves to drive in. I don't drive myself, but if I did, I'm sure I'd wear vintage leather driving gloves sometimes when doing so. :)

      Here's a post from Nov. 2012 with photos and details of how I store my rather hefty sized glove collection: http://www.chronicallyvintage.com/2012/11/how-i-store-my-vintage-glove-collection.html

      Big hugs & many thanks again for all of your wonderful blog comments this week,
      ♥ Jessica

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  39. Wonderful post! Gloves are a staple to a woman's authentic vintage wardrobe, but is oddly overlooked most of the time. I have a few pairs of vintage gloves, but would like to have more.

    Ivy

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    1. Thank you very much, dear Ivy. So true - much like hats, gloves have largely been ignored in the fashion world for a few decades now and its a crying shame, IMO. Gloves bring such life and vibrancy to an outfit. They can be sweet, chic, alluring, show-stopping and many other lovely things, while also having very practical applications.

      I hope you're able to grow your ow collection further. If I can ever help you try to track some down in specific colours, styles, lengths, etc, please don't hesitate to let me know.

      ♥ Jessica

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  40. Hello, just come across your blog! Was wondering I tend to wear my dresses with little cardigans, are gloves still suitable?

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    1. Hi there, thank you very much for your lovely question. Absolutely! Such was very common prior to the mid-1960s and makes for such a beautiful, classic look. Generally speaking, in such styling cases, it looks more authentic to opt for wrist length gloves (or ones that go only a wee bit up the forearm), but there are no hard and fast rules at all, so if you like the look of a longer pair of gloves in the context of a cardigan + dress outfit, than by all means go for it. You're going to look fabulous either way!

      ♥ Jessica

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  41. Hi Jessica, I have enjoyed all your posts about gloves. I have a bunch but haven't worn them for a while. I fondly remember wearing a red pair that was gathered in the late 1990s. Like the white pair in the Van Raalte ad with the lady with the royal blue dress, gold hat and pink gloves--what a combo! I always thought of them being from the 1980s but I guess they could work for other eras too like the 50s or 60s. Maybe 1940s. I think gloves and a hat--not in the the Fall/Winter--would really stand out. I think I'm too shy for that.

    I hope more ladies will be inspired to wear fashion gloves because of your posts on gloves. You have a beautiful collection!


    Dee

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    1. Thank you very much across the board, dear Dee. Your red gloves sound smashing and like they would definitely work in the context of a late 30s or 1940s outfit. I really like ruched/gathered gloves, with my favourite example that I own being a beautiful golden mustard-y yellow hued 40s pair (that I sported here most recently this spring in one of my outfit posts from our trip to the Kootenays back in April).

      I really hope so as well. Gloves are a beautiful, timeless accessory and great way to add further visual interest to any ensemble.

      Many thanks again & have a fantastic July,
      ♥ Jessica

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  42. Hello, Jessica. I really enjoy your blog, both texts and outfits, but i was rather surprised by some of the comments here that in some towns ladies do not wear gloves at all. I can hardly even touch public door handle with bare hands, and never feel my outfit being truly complete without a pair of gloves.

    Here in Moscow it is quite hard to find good gloves as most gloves being sold are warm ones or evening gloves of very poor quality. If you prefer wearing gloves all year around or need ones that are comfortable enough to stay in them indoors online shopping is required or shopping in EU countries.

    It is a rare thing here to see a lady in gloves during summer, but not impossible, even among random people on the street or in public transport. Asian tourists also notable for their glove fashion, as well as for their face protection, some their ways of wearing veils are really great.

    Sandra (mezzaninestore ru)

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    1. Hi Sandra, thank you for your lovely comment. It was very interesting to hear more about your personal experience with gloves, as well as how they factor into mainstream society in your corner of the world. I'm sorry that it's tricky to find good quality gloves where you live. Thankfully, no matter if one enjoys vintage or modern gloves, the web can offer up a treasure trove of options there. Certainly many of the pairs in my own collection have been purchased online over the years and I'm grateful to the many sellers who list vintage gloves in their shops.

      It's really neat that you spot people wearing fashion gloves sometimes out in public. I can probably count on one hand (pun not really intended :)) the number of times I've seen someone wearing fashion gloves over the years myself (at least after my 1980s childhood). It's a shame really, no matter where in the world one lives, that such is so very uncommon nowadays. Gloves were an integral part of human history for many centuries and deserve, IMO, to be appreciated and enjoyed on a larger scale again.

      That might never happen though, but at least many of us vintage fans are helping to keep the tradition of wearing them alive and well.

      Thanks again for your comment & have a fabulous August!
      ♥ Jessica

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