February 1, 2016

7 easy ways to wear vintage and still stay warm in the winter


Back in late 2013, I penned a post called Ten Cold Weather Vintage Wardrobe Staples that was inspired by no small part by the scads of comments that I get from fellow vintage fashion fans around the world regarding how to keep sporting old school styles when the temperature is chillier than that of a snowman convention.

If you haven't read that post yet (or want a refresher) I encourage you to check it out, as every last item listed there remains a firm favourite of mine for cold weather dressing. I continue to receive quite a few queries about this topic and as such thought that while winter is still out in full force, I would share some drop dead simple tricks that I use to stay warm when the mercury plummets.

Hailing from Canada, I know a thing or two about cold, snow, ice and the lengthy season that is winter, so each of the following seven tips is one that I employ on a regular basis myself throughout the chilly months of October to April. Of course they can be used any time of the year, if it's nippy outside, and aren't in any way specifically tied to Canada itself.

So without further ado, while I stare out at a heavily snow covered landscape this morning, allow me to share some of the easy-peasy things that I do year after year to keep stay warm, comfortable, and stylish no matter how cold it gets!



1. Sport a warp, shawl, real or faux fur stole, or cape over top of your winter coat. So often we think of our coats as the last and final layer in the war on hypothermia, but they need not be. Many a stylish mid-century (and earlier) lady knew the chic fashion power of further staying roasty-toasty thanks to the addition of a shawl, thick scarf, wrap, cape or the like atop her coat or jacket and it's a trick that we'd all be wise to weave into our own cold weather looks, too.




2. Layer thick tights, long johns, or leggings underneath your pants and long skirts/dresses. This is a lifesaver of a tip for me personally, as I'm loath to part ways with my skirts and dresses during the icy months. When it comes to pants, almost any time the temps are 10C or colder, I slip on a pair of tights or long johns (I haven't owned leggings since I was in grade school, but sometimes I think I should pick up some just for this purpose), usually with socks over my feet for further warmth, and find it helps to keep me many times warmer than if I only had trousers on.




3. Take a cue from polar explorers and mountain climbers everywhere and stack up your outfit in multiple thin to medium weight layers, as opposed to one or two bulky, potentially airy options. Atop my undergarments, I'll usually opt for a full slip and/or a camisole, a thin tee and/or knit, my main garment(s), a cardigan or sweater or blazer/suit jacket, and winter coat, plus a scarf, hat, gloves, boots, and potentially a pair of tights or long johns underneath, as touched on in the point above. This approach often creates less bulk, while also keeping air out and thus helping to trap more of your naturally generated heat close to your body.




4. Wear winter weight gloves inside of a real or faux fur muff. The gloves alone are a good and very natural start, but the muff ups the icy temp protection factor a great deal and almost like having a tiny portable (insulated) house to keep your hands in while you're out and about.





5. Put a lid on it!!! Your head that it! :) A huge percentage of body heat is lost through your noggin, so try to keep your head covered when you venture out. If your favourite vintage winter weather appropriate hats (think sturdy felts, wools, and - if it's not raining/snowing - velvet in terms of material) don't provide enough coverage, consider slipping on a solid coloured fleece ear warmer band or pair of earmuffs in a similar or complimentary hue.





6. Opt for fur (real or faux) or thermal fleece lined boots. Both of my pairs of current pairs of (modern, but wonderfully vintage appropriate) winter boots are faux fur lined (and one has some at the top of the ankles, too) and goodness, does it make a world of difference. Either of their pairs partnered with thick winter socks keeps to keep my feet (which are prone to being cold in general) significantly warmer than most other types of boots I've tried over the years.





7. Turtlenecks are your friend! I know that they're not everyone's cup of tea, but objectively, a basic black, grey, or navy blue turtleneck looks great on a wide range of people, is easy to find at almost any price point, and will never go out of style. If you don't want it to be the star of the show, layer it under a button front shirt, sweater, cardigan, or even a dress and, optionally, top it further with a scarf or shawl, thus almost disguising that you're sporting a turtleneck in the first place, yet staying fabulously warm in the process.


{To learn more about a specific image used above, please click on it to be taken to its respective source.}




As you might have guessed before delving into the specifics of today's list, layering is a key factor in many of these seven tips. Obvious as the advice to layer may seem, sometimes it helps to be reminded of (or introduced to, as the case may be) certain ways to do just that, particularly if you're new to dressing for extremely chilly winter temperatures (for example, if you just moved from Florida to Minnesota and have never experienced really cold temperatures before).

During the winter, try to always have extra layers either on your person or within arm's reach. My husband and I aim to keep an extra coat, pair of gloves, and warm socks in the back of our car for each of us, along with our vehicle's emergency survival kit, in case we run into trouble on the road or just happen to find ourselves somewhere that is especially chilly. I also generally have an additional pair of winter gloves, some one-time-use disposal hand warmer packs, and lots of heavy duty lip balm in my bag, too, as each one can help a good deal when you're facing arctic like weather.

Just because it's so chilly outside that ice cream is shivering, it doesn't mean that you can't still look and feel great in your vintage wardrobe during the colder months. Think close fitting layers, high quality garments, longer length pieces, seasonally appropriate accessories, and footwear that can stand up to a blizzard.

With these sorts of things in place, you're bound to look sensational even when the temperate becomes laughably low and all you can daydream about is how amazing it's going to be to sport sundresses again in a few months time.

We'll get there, of course, but right here and now, don your favourite old school winter threads and keep safe, cozy, and warm (or at least warmer) with the help of today's seven cold weather vintage styling tips.

82 comments:

  1. Hello Jessica, great advice style anti cold! Then I'm really cold of mine, I'm forced to wear warm tights, socks (hidden from pants or boots), sleeves and scarves .. at the end of all this I really like!

    kiss

    serena

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    1. Thank you kindly, my dear fellow fan of warm tights. They're beyond a staple of mine during the icy fall and winter months. I like tight a lot though (assuming they're comfy!), so I'm not complaining. :)

      The weather here has been all over the place lately. From near-blizzard level snow to bone chilling arctic winds to (cold) sunshine yesterday. Winter still has a few more weeks left to go here at least, so while it's out in full force, I will continue to avail of my own suggestions and enjoy the hidden fun (light tights) of wintertime dressing while it's still here.

      Big hugs & happy start of February wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  2. Ahh, the challenges of vintage style dressing in the colder months! Finally I know how to be glam but still warm, which is something I long struggled with.

    I went out today in the chill of early February wearing thick (thermal) tights, faux fur topped boots, a cotton petticoat and then a flouncy one under a circle skirt with a sleeveless thermal underneath a long sleeved cardigan, a shawl style scarf with my capelet jacket, long winter gloves and a knitted beret and I got a wonderful compliment (and the offer of a ladies dog as the finishing touch!) which confirms that being clever with the items you chose make it easy to be both warm and glamourous xxx

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    1. What a great comment, Melanie. Thank you very much! Your cold weather ensemble sounds smashing! Capes and caplets are an area of my closet that is sorely lacking. I should really try to find more over the next few months and hopefully be able to greet next fall by taking your lead and layering up a storm with them.

      Tons of hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  3. Great post! I m really struggling with winter. First I hate winter and second I have always cold! My problem is that I never have cold in upper part of my body because I have warm coat, but I have cold in my legs. I cant wear shoes and it is difficult to find nice boots and it ruins the combination. Also stockings, it is cold for nice tiny, transparent stockings. I need to have black and really thick one :(

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    1. Thank you sweetly, lovely lady. Goodness, do I hear you there! Have you tried fleece line tights? They're available at a wide range of price points and can be surprisingly toasty. Just the thing for those of us who like to keep wearing skirts and dresses even when the mercury is shivering.

      Big hugs from snowy Penticton,
      ♥ Jessica

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  4. Good morning Jessica,

    You have listed some great tips here. I love that velvet coat and fur stole! Isn't it fun to dress warmly in style?

    As a girl in Minnesota and Wisconsin, I always wore skirts and dresses to school. People always wondered why. My mother liked her girls in dresses. She never made that a rule, but we liked wearing dresses, too.

    When you look at old issues of National Geographic Magazine, it is not uncommon to see girls and women wearing dresses/skirts in snowy regions. I was always heavily influenced by old photos and movies.

    Although I live in California, much warmer than Canada, I do still wear my leggings under my pants and my skirts. I also wear a turtle neck under other layers many days during our colder season.

    Keep warm, my darling friend!
    ♥Hope

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    1. Very good point, dear Hope. I too have long taken notice of that and will sometimes find myself wondering, when I'm outside in stocking (or tight) clad legs and a skirt or dress during the winter, if I'm any colder or warmer than our foremothers of the 30s - 50s would have been. Before the 1920s (and in some places around the world, for a while longer still), one often had woolen tights and multiple pettiskirts/coats to help keep them warm, but in more recent decades, most of us, unless we opt to wear pre or very early 20th century fashion, do not have that option to avail of and thus must get extra creative when it comes to keeping winter's frigid temps at bay while sporting the dresses and skirts we adore.

      Aren't turtlenecks great? I fully understand that not everyone adores them, but I'm a big fan personally and reach for the tiny selection of them that I have very frequently during the snow covered months of late fall straight on to early spring. It's lovely that you really enjoy them as well.

      Many hugs & joyful start of February wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  5. Thin layers are my strategy too! I wore a formal dress on the weekend and layered a slip underneath and glam stole on top. Warm, yet dressy. It meant I could still wear strappy sandals as the rest of me was so cosy! I did rethink that slightly when we had a brief snow flurry mind! X

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    1. Your outfit sounds wonderful! I adore a great strappy sandal and full cop to having worn them during the winter (albeit, not for long periods outdoors, naturally), too. :)

      Thank you very much for your great comment, sweet Porecelina. I hope that February is off to a splendid start for you.

      Big hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  6. Excellent list! I do a lot of these things too since I don't wear trousers or jeans. The big help this winter has been silk long underwear. It doesn't show under clothing, is tissue thin, but really adds a lot of warmth. I usually layer thick cotton tights over the pants, and often a pair of cashmere knee socks over that! I wear the top as my base layer and go from there. I try to layer in threes: silk+cotton+wool. (Silk long underwear, cotton dress/tights, wool socks and wool sweater). I often add wool accessories like a cowl and fingerless mitts as well. I lived in Russia, and I found that layering wool headscarves is much warmer than a hat! The Pavlovo-Posad scarves are colorful, vintage appropriate and super warm, especially if you use two (one for your head, and another for your neck, or even over the top of the coat like a shawl. For super frigid, another pashmina type scarf wrapped around the face is helpful. I've lived in cold cities a long time, and appropriate layers while walking every where is key. And don't let your feet get cold!

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    1. That sounds positively heavenly! A few years back I had a set of bamboo long underwear. It was lovely, but didn't hold up that well. I've not tried silk before, but would certainly welcome the chance.

      Headscarves are fantastic! I've taken to tucking a scarf into my purse (if the one I'm carrying that day is large enough) during the chilly months just to make sure I often have that option at the ready if I find myself outdoors (and without a headscarf to begin with, I mean).

      How exciting that you lived in Russia. How long were you there for? I have some Russian blood (on my paternal side) and have always been incredibly drawn towards Russian, it's people, history, culture, and cuisine alike.

      Thank you very much for your terrific comment, dear Julianna.

      Big hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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    2. I lived there about a year and a half, all told. I love it! I miss living there so much. January in Russia is my favorite--it is so crisp and cold and bright! I love the language and the culture, and remain fascinated by the history. I miss Russian food. I hope to improve my language skills from afar!

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  7. Here in England we have the same problems as you for keeping warm. I must confess to doing all of the things mentioned here. I have many trousers almost identical to the ones you pictured, and I always wear long socks underneath. I find wool to be the best fabric for keeping me toastie. Great post to do at the moment, although we could do with a few pointers at how to deal with gale force winds ! Roll on some warmth and sunshine. Wishing you well my dear xx

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    1. Oh no, I'm sorry to hear that you're taking a licking from some mighty winds. We've not reached quite that level yet this winter, but the immensely chilly arctic winds are a near constant companion throughout much of the country all season long (the difference with the wind chill and without it can sometimes be as much as fifteen or more degrees colder).

      I hope that things aren't too terribly nippy right now and that a swift spring will soon come your way.

      Oodles of hugs & happy first week of February wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  8. Great tips! I live in Finland and we recently had a rather long cold spell here with temperatures down to -27 C. I took great pleasure in pulling out my vintage fur coats (black, one persian, one mink)! I also have some really lovely vintage wool/wool blend skirts that I have been using a lot.

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    1. Your coats sound marvelous! I adore Persian lamb's wool. It's one of my favourite fabrics ever and something that just sings out with the spirit of the past, IMO.

      Thank you very much for your wonderfully nice comment, sweet lady. I hope that things warm up for you very soon. I've experienced temperatures that cold (I think the coldest I've ever felt before the wind chill was factored in was about -44C, give or take a little) and know just how challenging they can be to dress for.

      Big hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  9. From this list I have done two: a small warp over a long coat (automatically adds a lux effect) and the turtleneck, which I have mixed feelings about.

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    1. Doesn't it just sing out with sophistication? I need to remember that trick more often myself (I tend to remember it more with blazers and suit jackets than I do with winter coats).

      I hope that your month is off to a great start, dear Lorena. Thank you very much for your lovely comment.

      Big hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  10. These are great tips! I started wearing extra pairs of leggings with just about everything this winter, I don't know why I never thought to do that before! Also one reason I love vintage clothing is that the fabric is usually a lot thicker, better quality, and so much warmer than the super thin stuff they make nowadays.. I have a grey sweater that I got at Target and oh my gosh, it's as thin as an old tee shirt!

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    1. Terrific point, sweet Sarah. Vintage fabric is often thicker and more durable (even thinner fabrics, I find, often tends to be stronger than their modern counterpoints - I was just remarking on that to Tony this past weekend in fact, in reference to a whisper thin mid-century cotton blouse that I have) and thus stands to grant the wearer a greater degree of warmth. The well known expression "they don't make 'em like they used to" (very) often applies to clothing (and accessories), which is no small part of the why, even so many years later, we still have quite a wealth of vintage wearables with us as a society.

      Many hugs & happy Thursday wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  11. Great post! Even if I'm quite experienced meahwhile how to survive cold winter days and still looking vintage-y, I have to confess that it's still challenging on me. I hate the cold and I feel limited if it comes to getting dressed fashionable in he cold season. Most days in winter I just feel tired and I just want to sit in bed in my pajamas and watch Netflix. ... Yes, I can't await spring ... through my ski underwear in the back of my wardrobe and pull out my light skirts, flats and sandals ... SPRING, Here I come!

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    1. You nail vintage winter wear superbly, my friend! From your amazing boots to your cute jackets to your stylish hats, you are definitely a big source of inspiration for me on this front.

      Thank you very much for your lovely comment. Have a fabulous first week of February!

      ♥ Jessica

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  12. A Vintage Vanity has a wonderful tutorial on making a faux fur hand muff. I've made one, on my way to making five more for my upcoming trip to Illinois. It's super easy!!

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    1. Great suggestion about that video (I adore her channel so much!). Thank you sweetly, Katherine.

      Happy muff creating!

      ♥ Jessica

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  13. Great tips Jessica! I have particularly learned the fur on top of a coat thing recently, having acquired a cape that I'll be wearing as part of my bridesmaid outfit in April, I've taken to wearing it over jumpers when my house gets cold and it works wonders! xx

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    1. Aren't capes magnificent creatures? I really need to add more to my closet. Your bridemaid's outfit sounds like it's going to be gorgeous! (Interesting side fact, I've not yet been a bridesmaid or maid-of-honour, but I was a flower girl as a small child.)

      Big hugs & many thanks for your lovely comment,
      ♥ Jessica

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  14. fabulouse tips from a winter-proof canadian gal!!
    i will sign every paragraph - because i do so since ages. i just bought some mens ski longjohns with wool in black - much warmer then tights and nobody will recognize under skirts and with the booties on my feet. a big plus of this garment is that its not so skintight on me (as ladies stuff) - this is much warmer!
    stay cosy!!! xxxxxx

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    1. Beate, you are a true master (much like fellow vintage German blogger, Ms. Falcon) at looking incredible and staying warm at the same time during the winter months (you always look awesome the whole year 'round, too, of course). Your way with layers is truly inspiring and I've often borrowed styling tips from your splendid ensembles.

      Tons of hugs & happy start of February wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  15. Thank you for this, Jessica. Even though it doesn't get /that/ cold where I am, the El Niño weather is really messing up with my "need" to look adorable. I will also keep these in my back pocket and implement them when the winter weather begins later this year.

    Carla, Tiny Angry Crafts

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    1. My absolute pleasure, dear Carla. Hopefully things won't get too chilly for you. As much as I enjoy elements of winter, it would be lovely to not get below freezing sometimes and to be spared needing to put these tips into action (I really have to experience a warm, or at least mild, winter some place further south than Canada one year).

      Many hugs & happy Thursday wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  16. Great tips! I agree especially with the hat thing. This is the first winter that I've worn anything vintage-ish, and I've been pleased to discover that my little cloche hat keeps my head just as warm as any modern knit ski cap. (I wouldn't wear it for, say, long hikes or skiing or something, but for just running around town when it's below freezing out, the vintage-style hat does the trick just fine!)

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    1. I think cloches are amongst the most darling hats a person can wear for winter. They are a million miles away from being flattering on me, or else I'd don them often myself, too. They're usually not quite as warm, but I reach for berets a lot during the fall and winter myself. True, probably best to leave such chapeaus at home if one is hitting the ski hill! :)

      Big hugs & many thanks for all of your wonderful recent blog comments, dear Grace,
      ♥ Jessica

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  17. Not to rub it in, but the only layering I ever have to resort to in Florida is maybe a cardi and a lightweight jacket or blazer. But looking when I see images of beautiful vintage winter coats it does make me long for colder weather sometimes, just so I can wear one of those fitted and flared princess style ones. Those are my favorite. Especially like the one in the picture with the little fur trimmed cape. Adorable!!!

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    1. That sounds heavenly right about now! I've ever experienced a warm winter. The closest I came was when I lived in Ireland, but even then, snow and chilly rain were common throughout the winter months. I really hope I can experience a sunny winter somewhere gloriously warm like your corner of the world someday.

      Isn't that one just darling? I adore the sense of sweetness and whimsy that ladies fashions so often had back then.

      Tons of hugs & happy start of February wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  18. Dear Jessica. May I add my trusted knitted arm and wrist warmers to your fabulous list. Basically, these are knitted tubes stretching from mid hand to mid upper arm. They are priceless under all those short sleeved 40s sweaters or tighter dresses that don't allow enough room for thick layering garments.

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    1. You may indeed, my dear, and what a fantastic tip! Thank you very much for the reminder of arm warmers. They're an awesome way to help keep the icy chill of winter at bay.

      Have a beautiful week!
      ♥ Jessica

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    1. Thank you very much, honey. I'm happy to know you enjoyed this fun winter fashion post.

      Big hugs & happy Thursday wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  20. Never underestimate the power of a good accessory! It's not as cold here, but hats and gloves make a huge difference. I do have leggings to wear under trousers when I walk the dog if it's really cold. He has to go out, so I have to find a way to stay warm! I also find that natural fibers (and furs) provide the best body-heat regulation.

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    1. That they definitely do - plus a pop of sparkle and/or colour can do a great deal for the psyche, too.

      I hear you there! We don't have a yard and thus our very sweet, but extremely high energy, dog needs to go out for long walks and/or dog park play sessions at least twice a day. Layers are an absolute must when doing so. Too bad we don't live closer, it would be a blast to get our pups together and chat vintage in the process.

      Many hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  21. All good advice whether one dresses vintage or not. I wears dresses and skirts 90% of the time and I love fleece-lined leggings. So soft and warm and cozy but not bulky. There are also fleece-lined tights but I have not tried them.

    It's funny how something so light as a full slip can make such a difference under a dress. I've been thinking of making a flannel slip but I wonder if it wouldn't lay right or bunch up under a dress.

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    1. Isn't it though! For that fact unto itself, it's downright surprising that so few people, outside of the vintage world at least, regularly wear them any more. Though, granted, with dresses and skirts being less common, I suppose it makes sense that they'd lose favour, too.

      Thank you very much for your lovely comment. I hope that you're having a terrific first week of February.

      Big hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  22. I think it's much easier to dress vintage when it's cold out! Granted, I run very hot, so in the summer I'm mostly concerned about being as naked as possible, but I love cashmere cardigans, wool skirts and dresses, and a nice fur topper, so cold weather is totally my jam. I love your advice, and I very much agree about utilizing thin layers instead of just a couple of bulky layers. One piece of advice that I would like to throw in is to look for wool pieces. They breathe, but they're still very warm, and they don't get crazy smelly when you start to sweat in them. I usually like to have something between my skin and anything wool, but that's not usually too hard to do.

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    1. Great advice, thank you very much for mentioning the benefits of sporting wool. I think that because I'm allergic to lamb's wool (direct contact between it and my skin usually gives me hives), I don't tend to "go there" first in my mind, even in the winter. I have knit garments of course though, but they're alternative materials such as acrylic or cotton.

      I think it's awesome that you find it easier to sport vintage in the colder months. There are certainly elements to it that I adore as well, definitely including layers and the fact that I run the risk of looking out-of-place in stockings or long sleeves (as can be the case to some people's eyes at least during the summer months). I think my very favourite seasons to dress for are spring and fall though, as you get much of the best of both summer and winter attire at the same time.

      I hope that things are well on your end as we embrace February and that you're having a blast dressing for these icy months.

      Many hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  23. Excellent tips and images Jessica! I can't wait to wear my winter clothing again! x

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    1. Thank you very much, sweet dear. Given how quickly the first month of 2016 flew by, chances are winter will reach you again in - to borrow a great old expression - two shakes of a lamb's tail. :)

      Big hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  24. I love wintertime for wearing furs and beautiful scarves and muffs! I just love wool frocks (which I'll be posting on soon) too. I really liked your tips and will be keeping them in mind. That's one great thing about your blog, you've always got good advice and tips!

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    1. Why, thank you, my dear! What a lovely compliment. I adore the fact that vintage fashion is such a diverse and dynamic topic that even after nearly seven years of running this blog, there is still so much more to cover and share my impute on.

      Many hugs & happy start of February wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  25. Great blog post Jessica! Our winters here in Sunny Queensland don't get near anywhere cold like yours! But even on the odd days it gets quite cold here I love getting ideas how to dress vintage but still stay warm! :)

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    1. Yay! :) I'm happy to know that you enjoyed these tips, sweet Camilla. It would be downright lovely to be spared such freezing temps - or at least given a breather from them. I'm sure it's a lot of fun to dress for, what would be to us more spring/fall, weather all season long.

      Big hugs & many thanks for your great comment,
      ♥ Jessica

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  26. Don't forget - natural fibres! Wool, alpaca and cashmere are all so much warmer than their synthetic imitators.

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    1. Absolutely! Thank you for raising that wise point, dear Mim. I'm allergic to lamb's wool (it usually causes me to break out into hives if it touches my skin for very long), so I don't always think of it first and foremost even in the winter - all the more reason why I appreciate you bringing it up.

      Many hugs & happy first week of February wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  27. This is a great guide, and although it doesn't get very cold where I live, I'll be sure to use some of these tips! Love the pictures too, especially for numbers one and three.

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    1. Thank you sweetly, my dear. It took a while to hunt down suitable images for some of these points, but thankfully in the end I was able to (and it was a very fun hunt, don't get me wrong). I want that lady's velvet coat in the first image soooo much! :)

      Oodles of hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  28. Like many vintage lovers I really struggled with wearing vintage looks during the winter when I first started wearing it full time, however, after making a conscious effort to improve my winter wardrobe I feel like I'm finally there. I have any amazing oversized faux fur tippet scarf that gets worn constantly and I really wish I could find another one like it in another colour. Layering is something I've really tried to do a lot but find it hard when I go indoors as I get so hot. It's about trying to find the right balance for what you're doing that day. xx

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    1. That's wonderful! Way to go on reaching that point. I've always been very at home in the fall and winter, but that isn't to say it hasn't been tricky for me to dress for those seasons at times, too (ditto, in different ways, for summer, especially since I virtually never wear short sleeves or sleeveless garments in public). Like yourself, at this stage in my life, I feel like I have things pretty down pat at this point and often look forward to the fashion side of winter more than most other elements of the season (though making snowmen and drinking hot cocoa are pretty high up there, too! :D).

      Thank you very much for your terrific comment, lovely Cate.

      Big hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  29. Awesome tips and stunning pictures <3

    Hugs, Pri
    vintage.blogspot.com

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    1. You're so sweet, thank you very much, dear Pri. I hope that things are well on your end this month and that you've having a wonderful week.

      Big hugs coming right back at you,
      ♥ Jessica

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  30. Tried to comment yesterday. But something was going wonky on my computer so not sure if it went through. Anyway, I don't get to do much layering down here in Florida. But seeing your photos of beautiful winter coats makes me wish sometimes it got colder down here. I would especially love to wear a fitted and flared new look style coat like the one in your photo with the fur trimmed cape. That is stunning!

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  31. I love winter for that simple reason that the more I can layer the happier I am ! haha
    Those thin waisted jacket pictures made me melt, how I love the fifties still <3

    xx
    Love,
    Lorna

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    1. Soooo true!!! I adore layers and frequently sport them even in the summer (albeit perhaps less in total and ones featuring thinner fabrics). That cozy element is one of my favourite things about cold weather fashion.

      Many hugs & happy First week of February wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  32. What a marvellous line up of tips. We all need reminding of ways to keep warm, it is a battle during the colder months and finding room for style in this season is very difficult for me.

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    1. It can be for sure, especially if one has an easier time finding spring/summer fashions that work well for them. Honestly, I keep a lot of my wardrobe in rotation all year long and find that can help a bit. A sleeveless summer dress, say, with a turtleneck and thick tights is suddenly winter appropriate, especially if the colours/pattern(s) of such pieces are in keeping with those of the season.

      Many hugs & thanks for your lovely comment,
      ♥ Jessica

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  33. These are such wonderful tips! Growing up and living in Singapore means I am terrible with the cold. I can't deal with it and I can't dress properly for it. Mostly importantly, I don't even have the wardrobe space for wool hats and gloves or even fancy coats. So, I often just end up feeling cold while looking fabulous or feeling warm but looking like a human marshmallow.

    Perhaps one day I will own a sustainable set of vintage/retro inspired winter gear which adds glamour that can be paired with anything and everything in my summer wardrobe!

    xox Gwen (@gwenstellamade)

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    1. Unless, perhaps, one either has a ton of storage space or really doesn't mind sporting the same small pool of items over and over again, that is definitely one of the keys to successful cold weather dressing (blending winter pieces with summer ones, I mean).

      Tony can relate you to you there. He's acclimatized a lot since first moving to Canada, but initially the freezing temps and mountains of snow were a lot for a native son of sizzling hot Italy to get used to (interestingly though, he's not wild about extreme heat either, preferring that of spring or fall).

      Big hugs & many thanks for your lovely comment,
      ♥ Jessica

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  34. EXCELLENT Post! I agree with it all and I pretty much do all of it as well too. But not today it's 14 degrees out! However winter is still here and my tights and multiple layers will be around for a bit longer.

    Stay warm Jessica :)

    Liz

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    1. Wow, that is downright balmy by Canadian winter standards. We haven't had anything near that warm since October (best I can recall). We did get treated to a spot of nippy sunshine on Groundhog's Day though, which was really lovely. Of course, this being Canada though, we've woken up to further snow again for the last two mornings.

      Thank you very much for your lovely comment, sweet Liz. Here's hoping spring graces both our sides of the country fairly soon.

      Big hugs,
      ♥ Jessica

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  35. I remember your first post about winter tips, is it really from 2013!? Time flies! These are great tips too, thank you for sharing them, dear. Might I add wool! Wool is still the best to keep warm and modern wool is lovely soft and not itchy at all. I've bouth myself two pale pink long camisoles, which I can wear under my dresses too. And I've bough long wool stockings (for garter belt) at Etsy, just search for Victorian socks/stockings. Skiing underwear is great wearing under dresses too since it is thin but keeps you warm. I wear a turtle neck under most of winter dresses, some of them have sequins or is beaded at the neck which makes them very stylish. All the snow has melted a week ago here in Denmark, but it is still cold. XOXO :)

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    1. I know, eh! Isn't it incredibly how quickly time flies. I was a bit surprised when I saw that it has been so long, too. I can very clearly remember writing that post and it feels little more than a few months ago that I did so.

      Do indeed add wool! It's a great suggestion and one that, being allergic to lamb's wool, I don't call to mind first and foremost. Thank you for bringing it up, sweet Sanne - ditto for your other marvelous ideas, very much including more traditional styles of stockings.

      It's still snowing up a storm here, complete with some fresh flakes this morning. Chances are we'll keep seeing it on and off until about the end of March (sometimes start of April).

      Many hugs & happy start of February wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  36. It doesn't get that cold here but I've learned the wisdom of layers when visiting colder climates.

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    1. How wonderful that such is one of the gifts that traveling has bestowed on you, sweet lady. If you ever visit Canada in the winter, it will come in very handy! :)

      Big hugs & happy start of the month wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  37. It was hard for me to get used to turtlenecks, I hated them as a child, but now I see how pretty they can look :)

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    1. Yay! Three cheers for team turtleneck! :)

      Big hugs, lovely Ines,
      ♥ Jessica

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  38. Hi, this is so fantastic great tips to glean from! I wrote a similar post called How Does a Girl Keep Warm.

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    1. Thank you very much, my dear. How cool! Please feel free to share the link to that post here with all of us, if you'd like.

      Many hugs from snowy Canada,
      ♥ Jessica

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  39. Great post. My problem is this winter it's so warm.my warmest clothes seem out of place

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    1. Oh wow, I can imagine that must be and feel a bit strange. I've never experienced a warm winter (the closest I've come in the brief chinooks that happen in parts of the prairie provinces), but would like to try it - at least once. A hot, sunny Christmas would feel quite alien to me as a Canadian though! :)

      Thank you for all of your lovely comments today. Have a fantastic weekend!

      ♥ Jessica

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  40. Oh, I want that hat, cardi and muff knitted set on the front of the Modern Knitting illustration you used! It is gorgeous. Great tips here, I really need to remember the one about adding something over my coat. So far this winter we haven't had many very cold days, just endless endless rain. I'm very ready to have some cold, bright frosty days where I could get some wear out of my hand knits!

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  41. Good morning Jess!
    Reading this DID gave me a bit of "fashion warming up", but to be honest: I'm not much of a winter person. I don't think I'll ever understand why would someone PAY to be send off - up the snow covered mountain just to slope right back down skiing. :)
    Honestly, winter reminds me of the frost-bites I got as a kid. My poor toes froze so much, that even now (year. as years later) I'm reminded of it, because they are BLUE. :)..yup, I've got Smurf-feet. :)
    ...
    However, if I must live in a continental climate and must have winter for a while - might as well look good while it lasts, right?

    M.

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    1. Oh my word, I'm so sorry that your poor feet suffered the wrath of winter to such a degree when you were little. Ouch!!! I hope that they don't cause you too much pain these days, sweet dear.

      Absolutely! Looking good is all the more important in the winter when doing so helps to keep one's spirits up.

      Big hugs & happy Sunday wishes,
      ♥ Jessica

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  42. These are fantastic, I'll have to bookmark this post and direct people to it when I get asked about staying warm. Thankfully we've not had it so bad this year with the cold, but the rain other hand has been atrocious

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